Picross e3 (Nintendo 3DS) Review

Picross e3 is the third downloadable 3DS entry in the long-running puzzle series, and much like its predecessor, it adds little in the way of variety. There’s another new colour scheme and a hard-as-nails Mega Picross mode for series veterans, but at its roots, this is little more than another £4.50 content update for the previous two games.

And that makes Picross e3 a tremendously difficult game to review. If you’ve played any Picross title in the past, chances are you know exactly what’s on offer here. Around twenty hours of puzzling, the bells and whistles you’d expect from a 3DS entry, and a quirky new mode – in this case the aforementioned Mega Picross puzzles.

These are few in number, although insanely difficult to master. Whereas normal picrosses see one number-clue per row and column, the clues given in Mega Picross can – and often do – span two columns or rows, with the solution following suit, meaning the next square in the group could be either above, beneath, or alongside the previously-filled cell. It’s a tremendously difficult set of rules to explain, which even Jupiter fails to fully explain within the game’s tutorials.

If you’re a Picross nut looking for more content, you’ll lap up the new puzzles on offer here. Played a previous game but feel you’ve had your Picross fill? Maybe the series isn’t challenging enough for you anymore? Mega Picrosses will sort you out and show you who’s boss. Never touched a Picross title before? e3 is as good a starting point as any, so why not hop aboard here?

Picross e3 (Nintendo 3DS) Verdict

Unless you’re completely adverse to the idea of Picross, there’s sure to be at least some enjoyment for you here. Even if you barely scratch the surface there’s little doubting that you’ll come away feeling content with your £4.50 purchase.

8/10

Originally published on NintendoInvader.com

Makes websites by day, writes about video games by night. Twitter: @martynlocker

Related Posts

Cursed to Golf (PlayStation 5) Review

Each one of Chuhai Labs’ games to date has been unique. First, it published a Halloween-themed retro platformer, then it developed a realistic VR snowboarding game, followed…

Mutropolis (Nintendo Switch) review

While it is certainly less prevalent than it used to be, the point-and-click adventure game genre is still alive and kicking. Night in the Woods, Thimbleweed Park,…

F1 22 (PlayStation 5) Review

F1 22 is my least favourite Codemasters entry to date – that’s not to say it’s the worst, though.

Hands on: Microsoft Flight Simulator’s Top Gun: Maverick DLC (Xbox Series S) with Thrustmaster T.Flight Full Kit X

While the box office is currently being set alight by Tom Cruise in Top Gun: Maverick, the world of gaming is going through a bit of a drought…

Bugsnax (Nintendo Switch) Review

Bugsnax is the second game from Chicago-based indie developer Young Horses, whose debut title Octodad was a viral hit thanks to its zany humour perhaps instead of its inspired story…

The House of the Dead: Remake (PlayStation 4) Review

The House of the Dead is a relic of its era – an arcade classic from SEGA credited, along with Resident Evil, for the popularisation of zombies in mainstream…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.